"From speeding to murder, if you are facing a criminal charge in the Magistrates’ Court or the Crown Court you will find this website full of clearly written, useful, practical information to assist you through the whole process from start to finish"

Who is this website for?

 
 

You might have been charged with a criminal offence or received a written charge and requisition. Perhaps you have been questioned by the police and you are waiting to find out if any action will be taken. So now you want to know what happens next. What is the procedure? What happens when I get to court? What sort of court will I go to and what’s the difference between the Crown Court and the Magistrates’ Court?  Will there be a jury? Will I get bail? What would happen if I pleaded guilty?  If I plead not guilty what will happen at my trial and how do I prepare and present my case in the best possible way?  Will I be questioned at court or can I refuse to answer questions?  How does cross-examine actually work?  Can I represent myself at court? If so, what’s the proceduire that I need to know from start to finish? If I am wrongly found guilty will I be able to appeal?  How does sentencing work? How can I avoid going to prison? Is there a way of finding out what my likely sentence is going to be?  If my sentence is too harsh will I be able to appeal?  

 

From speeding to murder, if you are facing a criminal charge in the Magistrates’ Court or the Crown Court you will find this website full of clearly written, useful, practical information to assist you through the whole process from start to finish, from going to court for the first time all the way through to appealing against a harsh sentence or wrongful conviction.  Defence-Barrister.co.uk has been written by Christopher Kessling, a barrister who has over 20 years’ experience working in the criminal courts in England & Wales.

 

The chances are if you are reading this you have a legal problem involving the criminal law.  Perhaps you are searching for information for a friend, relative or loved one who has a legal problem. Legal problems are no more welcome than an illness and, just as you would search for a doctor for sickness, you will try and find advice for a legal issue.  The trouble is, everyone knows where to go for illness – straight to your GP (for free) and take it from there.  If only the law were so straightforward.  Where do you go? Who or what is the first point of contact? What exactly are lawyers anyway? How do they work? How do I find a good one and, if I do, what will it cost? If I’ve got no money, is that the end of the line? What free legal services are out there and how do I find them? Am I eligible for free legal aid?  Even if I’m not, I work hard for my money, I’ve promised the kids a holiday and I just cannot afford to spend it all on lawyers!